Important American Furniture, Paintings, Folk Art and Decorative Arts – January 22, 2013 Auction Results

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Lot 71

71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock 71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock 71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock 71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock 71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock 71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock 71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock 71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock 71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock 71:  Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock

Chippendale Tall-Case Walnut Eight-Day Clock

Ellis & Isaac Chandlee, Nottingham, Pennsylvania, 1792-1804

Dial inscribed: ÒEllis & Isaac Chandlee / Nottingham"

The founder of the Chandlee dynasty of clock and scientific instrument makers was Benjamin Chandlee, Sr., who migrated in 1702 from Ireland to Philadelphia, where he was apprenticed to Abel Cottey, clockmaker, and eventually married CotteyÕs daughter. His son Benjamin Chandlee, Jr. (1723-1791), worked as a clockmaker in Nottingham, Chester County Pennsylvania, where he produced instrument as well as clocks. He had four sons, Goldsmith, Ellis, John and Isaac. Ellis Chandlee (1755-1816) was apprenticed to his father, and he worked with his brothers in the shop. He established the firm of Ellis Chandlee & Brothers in 1790, shortly before his fatherÕs death. The firm was dissolved in 1797 when the youngest brother, John Chandlee, left the firm. Ellis continued in partnership with his other brother, Isaac Chandlee (1760-1813), until about 1804, producing clocks, surveying instruments, and other metal articles. Their products were signed ÒEllis and Isaac Chandlee, Nottingham,Ó or, in the case of a surveying compass in the collection of the Chester County Historical Society, ÒE. & I. Chandlee, Nottingham.Ó Isaac Chandlee also produced clocks and instruments on his own, for there are a number of surviving clocks and surveying compasses signed in such manner.

The above information quoted from Silvio Bedini, "Early American Scientific Instruments and their makers," Washington D.C., Smithsonian, U.S. National Museum, 1964, p. 56

Provenance: Descended directly through the family of John Breckinridge (1760- 1806) to the present owner

H: 87 inches

Estimate: $6,000 - $12,000

Condition: The Walnut case retains an extremely desirable complex surface, with a warm mellow patina. The works are original to the case and are attached to their original saddle board. Minor flaking to enamel dial.

Price Realized: $14,880