Important American Furniture, Paintings, Folk Art and Decorative Arts – January 22, 2013 Auction Results

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Lot 63

63: Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table 63: Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table 63: Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table 63: Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table 63: Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table 63: Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table 63: Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table 63: Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table 63: Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table

Diminutive Queen Anne Maple Drop-Leaf Table

with Rounded Leaves

New England, probably Connecticut, 1740-1780
H. 27 in.; L. 28 _ in.; W. (closed) 11 1/8 in.; D. (open) 27 3/8 in.

This delicate table retains much of its original reddish wash --applied to the maple to make it appear as mahogany. This was often done- in both urban and rural areas- so that a native wood would appear as much more expensive imported mahogany. The present table and lot 53, a high style example in mahogany with rectangular drop-leaves, are extremely rare and highly prized by collectors of 18th century American furniture

Provenance: Descended in a family from South Weymouth, Massachusetts;
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Antiques Show, Herrup & Wolfner, 1989

Literature: for a unique pair of diminutive Queen Anne drop-leaf tables, please see Albert M. and Robert M. Sack, "American Antiques from the Israel Sack Collection," Vol. IV, New York: Highland House, 1974, p. 981, pl. P3678.

Estimate: $15,000 - $30,000

It is an honor and pleasure for Keno Auctions to offer for sale the Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Robert Isbell. People collect for a variety of reasons; the Isbells assembled a fabulous Americana collection because of their passion for each piece. Over three decades they sought out the best examples of high quality Colonial American furniture and folk art using the criteria of quality, rarity, condition and provenance as their guide

Condition: Retains a warm old color, especially on top of knees and on pad feet. The surface of the top has been cleaned, perhaps from usage. The hinges are original and the screws and rosehead nails that affix them to the table are un-disturbed. Note: two legs of this table were constructed of laminated wood. The laminates can be seen on two knees ( one laminate has been reattached with old cut nails) a 1/4 inch section of one pad foot, directly below the laminated knee, may have been replaced at a very early date, perhaps in the 18th century. Another pad foot has been cracked roughly in half and has been re-glued.